(PDF) Inflammation and vitamin D: the infection connection (2014) | Meg Mangin | 172 Citations (2022)

Journal ArticleDOI

Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of mortality in adults

[...]

Cindy Stern, Charlotte Young, Phyllis Skorga

01 Dec 2014-International Journal of Evidence-based Healthcare

TL;DR: The beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation on the prevention of mortality in healthy adults and in adults with a stable form of disease are assessed.

Abstract: Relevance to nursing care The evidence available regarding vitamin D on mortality has been inconclusive. Vitamin D can be obtained from sun exposure on skin, dietary intake, or supplementation as vitamin D3 or D2. Proper balance of vitamin D and calcium levels are important for healthy bones. Past studies have indicated that vitamin D supplementation prevents osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and fractures. Contradictory studies suggest that vitamin D may prevent cancer, cardiovascular disease, and affect mortality; and observational research has indicated a relationship of low vitamin D levels and risk of mortality. Evidence related to vitamin D is important for nurses working with patients with and without vitamin D insufficiency. The value of vitamin D needs clarification, and health information about risk factors, common problems with deficiency, as well as the benefits and proper use of vitamin D supplementation are needed by patients and caregivers. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation on the prevention of mortality in healthy adults and in adults with a stable form of disease.

270citations

Journal ArticleDOI

Immune Function and Micronutrient Requirements Change over the Life Course

[...]

(Video) Autoimmune Diseases: Can a Vegan Diet Help?

17 Oct 2018-Nutrients

TL;DR: This review looks at immune considerations specific to each life stage, the consequent risk of infection, micronutrient requirements and deficiencies exhibited over the life course, and the available evidence regarding the effects of micronsutrient supplementation on immune function and infection.

Abstract: As humans age, the risk and severity of infections vary in line with immune competence according to how the immune system develops, matures, and declines. Several factors influence the immune system and its competence, including nutrition. A bidirectional relationship among nutrition, infection and immunity exists: changes in one component affect the others. For example, distinct immune features present during each life stage may affect the type, prevalence, and severity of infections, while poor nutrition can compromise immune function and increase infection risk. Various micronutrients are essential for immunocompetence, particularly vitamins A, C, D, E, B2, B6, and B12, folic acid, iron, selenium, and zinc. Micronutrient deficiencies are a recognized global public health issue, and poor nutritional status predisposes to certain infections. Immune function may be improved by restoring deficient micronutrients to recommended levels, thereby increasing resistance to infection and supporting faster recovery when infected. Diet alone may be insufficient and tailored micronutrient supplementation based on specific age-related needs necessary. This review looks at immune considerations specific to each life stage, the consequent risk of infection, micronutrient requirements and deficiencies exhibited over the life course, and the available evidence regarding the effects of micronutrient supplementation on immune function and infection.

212citations

Cites background from "Inflammation and vitamin D: the inf..."

  • ...Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of infection and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes, probably related to activity of vitamin D receptors, which are found throughout the immune system [106,107]....

    [...]

MedlinePlus

[...]

王林, 黄亚明

01 Aug 2010-

TL;DR: MedlinePlus是链接美国国立卫生研究所(NIH)院内各机构和、NIH涵盖的生物医学信息资源既广且深,又相互�

Abstract: MedlinePlus是链接美国国立卫生研究所(NIH)院内各机构和美国国家生物技术信息中心的重要渠道之一。NIH涵盖的生物医学信息资源既广且深,又相互交叉,从各主要栏目页面很难全面获得所需信息。MedlinePlus汇集了美国国家医学图书馆(NLM)、NIH和其他政府机构以及医疗组织的权威信息,并为解答健康问题提供引导信息。MedlinePlus还包括Medline检索,提供医学期刊论文的快速入口,处方和非处方药物的详细信息,附有插图的医学百科全书、互动性强的指南、多媒体卫生信息、数千种临床试验的链接、以及每日更新的卫生信息。

160citations

(Video) (Audio Described) National Advisory Eye Council Meeting, June 2020

Journal ArticleDOI

Association of Serum Level of Vitamin D at Diagnosis With Breast Cancer Survival: A Case-Cohort Analysis in the Pathways Study.

(Video) 10-11-19 Sarcoidosis Cure? How I Helped My doctor Cure Me Using The CLEAR Antibiotic Regimen

[...]

Song Yao1, Marilyn L. Kwan2, Isaac J. Ergas2, Janise M. Roh2 +10 moreInstitutions (3)

01 Mar 2017-JAMA Oncology

TL;DR: Serum 25OHD levels were independently associated with breast cancer prognostic characteristics and patient prognosis, most prominently among premenopausal women, and provide compelling observational evidence on associations of vitamin D with lower risk of breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

Abstract: Importance There are long-standing interests in the potential benefits of vitamin D for preventing breast cancer recurrence and mortality, yet data from prospective cohort studies are limited. Objective To investigate a serum biomarker of vitamin D status, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) measured at the time of breast cancer diagnosis, to determine the association with prognosis. Design, Setting, and Participants The Pathways Study is a prospective cohort study of breast cancer survivors established in 2006. Enrollment was completed in 2013; follow-up is ongoing. The cohort was established in Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care delivery system in northern California. Women with a diagnosis of incident invasive breast cancer were typically consented and enrolled within 2 months of diagnosis. The overall enrollment rate was 46% (4505 of 9820). Participants are followed for health outcomes and comorbidities at 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 months after baseline interview. A case-cohort design was used for efficiency assay of 25OHD, selecting 1666 cohort members with serum samples and ensuring representation in the subcohort of races and clinical subtypes. The data analysis was performed from January 5, 2014, to March 15, 2015. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcomes are breast cancer recurrence, second primary cancer, and death. Results Mean (SD) age was 58.7 (12.4) years. Serum 25OHD concentrations were lower in women with advanced-stage tumors, and the lowest in premenopausal women with triple-negative cancer. Levels were also inversely associated with hazards of disease progression and death. Compared with the lowest tertile, women with the highest tertile of 25OHD levels had superior overall survival (OS). This association remained after adjustment for clinical prognostic factors (hazard ratio [HR], 0.72; 95% CI, 0.54-0.98). Among premenopausal women, the association with OS was stronger, and there were also associations with breast cancer–specific survival and invasive disease–free survival (OS: HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21-0.96; breast cancer–specific survival: HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.93; invasive disease–free survival: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.34-1.01; all after full adjustment). Conclusions and Relevance Serum 25OHD levels were independently associated with breast cancer prognostic characteristics and patient prognosis, most prominently among premenopausal women. Our findings from a large, well-characterized prospective cohort provide compelling observational evidence on associations of vitamin D with lower risk of breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

Journal ArticleDOI

Role of Vitamin D in the Hygiene Hypothesis: The Interplay between Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptors, Gut Microbiota, and Immune Response

[...]

(Video) Bone Health Webinar - August 1, 2017

Allison Clark1, Núria Mach1Institutions (1)

23 Dec 2016-Frontiers in Immunology

TL;DR: Insight is gained on how the VDR functions affects inflammation, autophagy, and microbiota composition that could lead to the development of pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, while confirming the role vitamin D and VDRs have in the context of hygiene hypothesis.

Abstract: The hygiene hypothesis postulates that higher levels of cleanliness and improper exposure to microorganisms early in childhood could disturb the intestinal microbiome resulting in abnormal immune responses. Recently, more attention has been put on how a lack of sun exposure and consequently vitamin D deficiency could lead to less immune tolerance and aberrant immune responses. Moreover, vitamin D receptor (VDR) function has been positioned to be a critical aspect of immune response and gut homeostasis. Therefore, this review focuses on the role that the interaction between vitamin D, VDR function and gut microbiome might have on autoimmune diseases in the context of the hygiene hypothesis. Literature shows that there is a high correlation between vitamin D deficiency, VDR dysfunction, gut microbiota composition and autoimmune diseases. The biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, serves as the primary ligand for VDRs which have been shown to play a fundamental role in reducing autoimmune disease symptoms. Although the biological functions of VDR, the effects of its genetic variants and the effects of epigenetic profiles in its promoter region are largely unknown in humans, studies in murine models are increasingly demonstrating that VDRs play a crucial role in attenuating autoimmune disease symptoms by regulating autophagy and the production of antimicrobial peptides such cathelicidin and β-defensin, which are responsible for modifying the intestinal microbiota to a healthier composition. Remarkably, evidence shows that hormonal compounds and byproducts of the microbiota such as bile acids might also activate VDR. Therefore, understanding the interaction between VDR and gut microbiota is of the utmost importance towards understanding the rise in autoimmune diseases in Western countries. We have gained insights on how the VDR functions affects inflammation, autophagy, and microbiota composition that could lead to the development of pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, while confirming the role vitamin D and VDRs have in the context of hygiene hypothesis.

82citations

Cites background from "Inflammation and vitamin D: the inf..."

FAQs

What is the connection between vitamin D and inflammation? ›

Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the ...

Is vitamin D deficiency linked to inflammation? ›

According to 2021 research, vitamin D has been shown to have a powerful anti-inflammatory effect, and deficiencies in this nutrient may contribute to chronic inflammation.

How much vitamin D should you take for inflammation? ›

“I would recommend taking a vitamin D supplement daily. I personally recommend a circulating level of 25(OH)D to be 50 ng/ml.

Does d3 reduce inflammation? ›

Low levels of vitamin D have been consistently linked to an increased risk of inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, multiple sclerosis (MS), and sepsis.

What infections cause vitamin D deficiency? ›

If you often become sick, especially with colds or the flu, low vitamin D levels may be a contributing factor. Several large observational studies have shown a link between a deficiency and respiratory tract infections such as colds, bronchitis, and pneumonia ( 7 , 8 ).

What is the fastest way to reduce inflammation in the body? ›

Simple rules of thumb for anti-inflammatory eating:
  1. Eat more plants. Whole plant foods have the anti-inflammatory nutrients that your body needs. ...
  2. Focus on antioxidants. They help prevent, delay or repair some types of cell and tissue damage. ...
  3. Get your Omega-3s. ...
  4. Eat less red meat. ...
  5. Cut the processed stuff.
13 Aug 2019

What are the 5 classic signs of inflammation? ›

Based on visual observation, the ancients characterised inflammation by five cardinal signs, namely redness (rubor), swelling (tumour), heat (calor; only applicable to the body' extremities), pain (dolor) and loss of function (functio laesa).

How do you reverse inflammation? ›

Follow these six tips for reducing inflammation in your body:
  1. Load up on anti-inflammatory foods. ...
  2. Cut back or eliminate inflammatory foods. ...
  3. Control blood sugar. ...
  4. Make time to exercise. ...
  5. Lose weight. ...
  6. Manage stress.
15 Jan 2020

What vitamin is best for inflammation? ›

Vitamin C. Vitamin C, like vitamin D, is an essential vitamin that plays a huge role in immunity and inflammation. It's a powerful antioxidant, so it can reduce inflammation by neutralizing free radicals that cause oxidative damage to your cells ( 55 ).

Which vitamin is anti-inflammatory? ›

Vitamin A also has a role as an anti-inflammatory agent. Supplementation with vitamin A has been found to be beneficial in a number of inflammatory conditions, including skin disorders such as acne vulgaris, broncho-pulmonary dysplasia and some forms of precancerous and cancer states.

What is the main cause of inflammation in the body? ›

Possible Causes

The most common reasons for chronic inflammation include: Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, where your body attacks healthy tissue. Exposure to toxins, like pollution or industrial chemicals. Untreated acute inflammation, such as from an infection or injury.

What is the most powerful anti-inflammatory? ›

What is the strongest anti-inflammatory medication? Research shows diclofenac is the strongest and most effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine available.

Does Vit D cure inflammation? ›

An active metabolite of vitamin D—(not the over-the-counter version) — is involved in shutting down inflammation, which could potentially be beneficial in patients with severe COVID-19.

Can too much vitamin D cause leg swelling? ›

You can also get chronic headaches, dizziness, leg swelling, skin that's itchy and scaly, hair loss and joint pains. Vitamin D toxicity will raise the calcium level in your blood, which in itself is harmful.

Does vitamin D suppress immune system? ›

Vitamin D can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses. Deficiency in vitamin D is associated with increased autoimmunity and an increased susceptibility to infection.

Can low vitamin D cause back pain? ›

Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency can cause or worsen neck and back pain and muscle spasm.

What fruits are anti-inflammatory? ›

Eat these fruits for their anti-inflammatory benefits
  • Berries. From strawberries and blackberries to cranberries and blueberries, these gemlike fruits are particularly potent in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. ...
  • Apples. ...
  • Stone fruits. ...
  • Grapes. ...
  • Citrus. ...
  • Pomegranates. ...
  • Image: Kwangmoozaa/Getty Images.
13 Oct 2021

Is coffee good for inflammation? ›

Bottom Line on Coffee and Inflammation

Coffee is a primary source of polyphenols in our diet, and these antioxidant compounds exert beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in most people.

Does apple cider vinegar help with inflammation? ›

Apple cider vinegar is a strong anti-inflammatory so it can help decrease pain associated with an inflammatory condition, such as the multiple types of Arthritis. It also prevents lactic acid buildup in the muscles, which not only keeps energy high but also decreases soreness and achiness in the muscles.

What food causes inflammation? ›

What foods cause inflammation?
  • Red meat and processed meats, including bacon, hot dogs, lunch meats and cured meats.
  • Refined grains, including white bread, white rice, pasta and breakfast cereals.
  • Snack foods, including chips, cookies, crackers and pastries.
  • Sodas and other sweetened drinks.
  • Fried foods.
29 Jun 2022

What are the 3 warning signs of inflammation? ›

What Are the Symptoms of Inflammation?
  • Redness.
  • A swollen joint that may be warm to the touch.
  • Joint pain.
  • Joint stiffness.
  • A joint that doesn't work as well as it should.
15 Oct 2020

How long does it take to reduce inflammation in the body? ›

Acute inflammation usually occurs for a short (yet often severe) duration. It often resolves in two weeks or less.

What foods quickly reduce inflammation? ›

Anti-inflammatory foods

green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and collards. nuts like almonds and walnuts. fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines. fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and oranges.

What foods to avoid if you have inflammation? ›

People who are following an anti-inflammatory diet should avoid or limit their intake of:
  • processed foods.
  • foods with added sugar or salt.
  • unhealthful oils.
  • processed carbs, which are present in white bread, white pasta, and many baked goods.
  • processed snack foods, such as chips and crackers.

What veggies cause inflammation? ›

Nightshade Vegetables

Eggplants, peppers, tomatoes and potatoes are all members of the nightshade family. These vegetables contain the chemical solanine, which some people claim aggravates arthritis pain and inflammation.

Does B12 reduce inflammation? ›

Conclusions: Serum vitamin B12 concentrations were associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and biochemical markers of cardiometabolic risks in adults. Maintaining adequate vitamin B12 concentrations may lower inflammation-induced cardiometabolic risk in the Saudi adult population.

What natural remedy is good for inflammation? ›

There is some evidence to support the claim that turmeric, green tea, and ginger have anti-inflammatory properties. For people with inflammatory health conditions, consuming these herbal remedies could be useful for reducing inflammation.

Does zinc help with inflammation? ›

Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines.

Is ginger good for inflammation? ›

Ginger: With antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, ginger can even help ease severe inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Turmeric: This yellow spice boasts a chemical that inhibits chronic inflammatory signals in the body.

Is garlic good for inflammation? ›

As if wasn't already super nutritious and low in calories, garlic also offers anti-inflammatory benefits. Garlic contains diallyl disulfide an anti-inflammatory compound that limits the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. If you have sore and inflamed joints or muscles, you can rub them with garlic oil.

Does sugar cause inflammation? ›

Consuming too much added sugar can raise blood pressure and increase chronic inflammation, both of which are pathological pathways to heart disease.

What are the 3 main causes of inflammation? ›

Causes of an inflammation

Pathogens (germs) like bacteria, viruses or fungi. External injuries like scrapes or damage through foreign objects (for example a thorn in your finger) Effects of chemicals or radiation.

Do tomatoes cause inflammation? ›

Some people feel that eating foods from the nightshade family, also known as solanaceous vegetables, may make their arthritis worse. But research has shown that there is no link between inflammation and solanaceous vegetables. Examples of nightshade vegetables include: Tomatoes.

Is inflammation caused by infection? ›

Inflammation is not a synonym for infection, even in cases where inflammation is caused by infection. Although infection is caused by a microorganism, inflammation is one of the responses of the organism to the pathogen.

Does vitamin D have anti-inflammatory properties? ›

It is widely thought that vitamin D plays an important role in the modulation of the inflammation system by regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and immune cells, which are crucial for the pathogenesis of many immune-related diseases.

What is the main cause of inflammation in the body? ›

Possible Causes

The most common reasons for chronic inflammation include: Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, where your body attacks healthy tissue. Exposure to toxins, like pollution or industrial chemicals. Untreated acute inflammation, such as from an infection or injury.

Which vitamin is anti-inflammatory? ›

Vitamin A also has a role as an anti-inflammatory agent. Supplementation with vitamin A has been found to be beneficial in a number of inflammatory conditions, including skin disorders such as acne vulgaris, broncho-pulmonary dysplasia and some forms of precancerous and cancer states.

How can I reduce inflammation in my body? ›

Simple rules of thumb for anti-inflammatory eating:
  1. Eat more plants. Whole plant foods have the anti-inflammatory nutrients that your body needs. ...
  2. Focus on antioxidants. They help prevent, delay or repair some types of cell and tissue damage. ...
  3. Get your Omega-3s. ...
  4. Eat less red meat. ...
  5. Cut the processed stuff.
13 Aug 2019

Can I take 5000 IU of vitamin D3 everyday? ›

In summary, long-term supplementation with vitamin D3 in doses ranging from 5000 to 50,000 IUs/day appears to be safe.

How much vitamin D should I take for autoimmune? ›

This study of more than 25 000 older adults in the US provides evidence that daily supplementation with 2000 IU/day vitamin D or a combination of vitamin D and omega 3 fatty acids for five years reduces autoimmune disease incidence, with more pronounced effects found after two years of supplementation.

Can you take too much D3? ›

Vitamin D is important for your bones, muscles, nerves, immune system, and more. But if you get too much, it could lead to a rare and possibly serious condition called vitamin D toxicity. You may hear your doctor call it hypervitaminosis D. The condition can bring symptoms like weakness and vomiting.

What are the 3 main causes of inflammation? ›

Causes of an inflammation

Pathogens (germs) like bacteria, viruses or fungi. External injuries like scrapes or damage through foreign objects (for example a thorn in your finger) Effects of chemicals or radiation.

What is the strongest anti-inflammatory? ›

What is the strongest anti-inflammatory medication? Research shows diclofenac is the strongest and most effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine available.

What are the 5 classic signs of inflammation? ›

Based on visual observation, the ancients characterised inflammation by five cardinal signs, namely redness (rubor), swelling (tumour), heat (calor; only applicable to the body' extremities), pain (dolor) and loss of function (functio laesa).

What reduces inflammation fast? ›

To reduce inflammation fast, limit your intake of sugar and processed foods. Perhaps, more importantly, though, pursue exercise, stress-reducing behaviors, a good night's sleep, and a diet full of colorful, anti-inflammatory foods.

What natural remedy is good for inflammation? ›

There is some evidence to support the claim that turmeric, green tea, and ginger have anti-inflammatory properties. For people with inflammatory health conditions, consuming these herbal remedies could be useful for reducing inflammation.

What foods to avoid if you have inflammation? ›

Foods that cause inflammation

refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries. French fries and other fried foods. soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages. red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)

What fruits are anti-inflammatory? ›

Eat these fruits for their anti-inflammatory benefits
  • Berries. From strawberries and blackberries to cranberries and blueberries, these gemlike fruits are particularly potent in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. ...
  • Apples. ...
  • Stone fruits. ...
  • Grapes. ...
  • Citrus. ...
  • Pomegranates. ...
  • Image: Kwangmoozaa/Getty Images.
13 Oct 2021

What are the 10 foods that fight inflammation? ›

Top 10 foods that fight inflammation
  • Berries, including blueberries, strawberries, raspberries and more.
  • Salmon, tuna and other fatty fish (yes, sardines, too).
  • Nuts, including walnuts and almonds.
  • Olive oil, especially extra virgin olive oil.
  • Peppers, including bell and chili peppers.
15 Apr 2021

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