Meloxicam: MedlinePlus Drug Information (2022)

pronounced as (mel ox' i cam)

  • Why is this medication prescribed?
  • How should this medicine be used?
  • Other uses for this medicine
  • What special precautions should I follow?
  • What should I do if I forget a dose?
  • What side effects can this medication cause?
  • What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?
  • In case of emergency/overdose
  • What other information should I know?
  • Brand names

People who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as meloxicam may have a higher risk of having a heart attack, or a stroke than people who do not take these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time. Do not take an NSAID such as meloxicam if you have recently had a heart attack, unless directed to do so by your doctor. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, a stroke, if you smoke, and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of the body, or slurred speech.

If you will be undergoing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG; a type of heart surgery), you should not take meloxicam right before or right after the surgery.

NSAIDs such as meloxicam may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may develop at any time during treatment, may happen without warning symptoms, and may cause death. The risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time, are older in age, have poor health, or drink large amounts of alcohol while taking meloxicam. Tell your doctor if you take any of the following medications: anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); aspirin; other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); oral steroids such as dexamethasone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Rayos); selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Selfemra, in Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Brisdelle, Paxil, Pexeva), and sertraline (Zoloft); or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as desvenlafaxine (Khedezla, Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and venlafaxine (Effexor XR). Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had ulcers or bleeding in your stomach or intestines, or other bleeding disorders. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking meloxicam and call your doctor: stomach pain, heartburn, vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will monitor your symptoms carefully and will probably order certain tests to check your body's response to meloxicam. Be sure to tell your doctor how you are feeling so that your doctor can prescribe the right amount of medication to treat your condition with the lowest risk of serious side effects.

(Video) Meloxicam - Mechanism, precautions, side effects & uses

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with meloxicam and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Meloxicam is used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints). Meloxicam is also used to relieve the pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (a type of arthritis that affects children) in children 2 years of age and older. Meloxicam is in a class of medications called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It works by stopping the body's production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation.

Meloxicam comes as a tablet and suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Take meloxicam at the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take meloxicam exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Shake the suspension well before each use to mix the medication evenly.

Meloxicam is also used sometimes to treat ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis that mainly affects the spine). Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

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Before taking meloxicam,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to meloxicam, sorbitol, aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn),any other medications, or any of the ingredients in meloxicam tablets and suspension. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril , enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Zestoretic), and quinapril (Accupril, in Accuretic, in Quinaretic); angiotensin receptor blockers such as azilsartan (Edarbi, in Edarbyclor), candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, in Benicar HCT, in Tribenzor), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT, in Twynsta); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal, Innopran); cholestyramine (Prevalite); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); diuretics ('water pills'); lithium (Lithobid); methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall); and pemetrexed (Alimta). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, especially if you have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose); heart failure; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; or kidney or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant; or are breast-feeding. Meloxicam may harm the fetus and cause problems with delivery if it is taken around 20 weeks or later during pregnancy. Do not take meloxicam around or after 20 weeks of pregnancy, unless you are told to do so by your doctor. If you become pregnant while taking meloxicam, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking meloxicam.
  • if you have fructose intolerance (an inherited condition in which the body lacks the protein needed to break down fructose [a fruit sugar found in certain sweeteners such as sorbitol]), you should know that the oral suspension is sweetened with sorbitol. Tell your doctor if you have fructose intolerance.

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Meloxicam may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • gas
  • sore throat

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately. Do not take any more meloxicam until you speak to your doctor:

  • fever
  • blisters
  • rash
  • skin blisters or peeling
  • hives
  • itching
  • swelling of the eyes, face, tongue, lips, or throat
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • hoarseness
  • pale skin
  • fast heartbeat
  • shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • unexplained weight gain,
  • swelling in the abdomen, ankles, feet, or legs
  • nausea
  • excessive tiredness
  • lack of energy
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • pain in the right upper part of the stomach
  • flu-like symptoms
  • cloudy, discolored, or bloody urine
  • back pain
  • difficult or painful urination

Meloxicam may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

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If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

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Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • lack of energy
  • drowsiness
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • bloody, black, or tarry stools
  • vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds
  • difficulty breathing
  • seizures
  • coma

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

  • Mobic®
Last Revised - 03/15/2021

FAQs

Meloxicam: MedlinePlus Drug Information? ›

Meloxicam is used to relieve pain, tenderness, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining of the joints) and rheumatoid arthritis (arthritis caused by swelling of the lining of the joints).

What are the dangers of taking meloxicam? ›

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine and can occur without warning. However, possible warning signs often occur, including severe stomach pain, black tarry stools, vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds, skin rash, swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs.

What exactly does meloxicam do? ›

Descriptions. Meloxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to relieve the symptoms of arthritis (juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis), such as inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain.

Is meloxicam a painkiller or anti-inflammatory? ›

It reduces pain, swelling, and stiffness of the joints. Meloxicam is known as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). If you are treating a chronic condition such as arthritis, ask your doctor about non-drug treatments and/or using other medications to treat your pain.

Is meloxicam the strongest anti-inflammatory? ›

Is meloxicam (Mobic) stronger than ibuprofen? Meloxicam (Mobic) is generally considered a stronger medication than ibuprofen. Both medications belong to a class of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Why can't you drink coffee while taking meloxicam? ›

The tannins present in coffee can bind to these medications and stop the body from absorbing them as effectively. This interaction will only occur if coffee is consumed within 1-2 hours of taking the medication, but still warrants careful monitoring in these patients.

How long can you take meloxicam for arthritis? ›

If prescribed for pain, NSAIDs like meloxicam are typically meant to be taken for short periods of time. In fact, it's usually not used for more than 10 days in a row.

When is the best time to take meloxicam? ›

Meloxicam is a once-daily non-steroid antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that you can take by mouth at any time of the day. It's best take your medicine at about the same time each day, and with food or a meal to help prevent an upset stomach.

Is meloxicam a strong painkiller? ›

Meloxicam is a strong painkiller that must be prescribed by a doctor. It can come as a regular tablet, disintegrating tablet, capsule, or oral suspension liquid. Some popular brand names of meloxicam include Mobic, Vivlodex, Qmiiz ODT, and Comfort Pac-Meloxicam.

Is meloxicam safe to take everyday? ›

Conclusions Meloxicam is a safe and effective medication for the symptomatic treatment of OA. The data support consideration of 7.5 to 15 mg of meloxicam once daily to treat the pain and stiffness of OA, with gastrointestinal tolerability comparable to that of placebo.

How many hours does meloxicam last? ›

Although both ibuprofen and meloxicam are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), meloxicam is a long-acting drug that can relieve pain for up to 24 hours and it is not prescribed in combination with other drugs.

Does meloxicam raise blood pressure? ›

This medication may increase or worsen your blood pressure. This can increase your risk of heart attack or stroke. Your doctor may check your blood pressure while you're taking meloxicam. Some medicines for high blood pressure may not work as well as they should when you're taking meloxicam.

Can you take meloxicam for years? ›

Although 15 mg meloxicam is approved for the management of arthritis-related joint pain, it's not recommended for long-term use.

Will meloxicam make you sleepy? ›

Sleepiness is not a common side effect of meloxicam. However, overdosing on meloxicam may cause some sleepiness. In this case, you may need to seek immediate medical attention. The most common side effects of meloxicam include abdominal pain, nausea, dizziness, and headache.

What's the strongest anti-inflammatory? ›

What is the strongest anti-inflammatory medication? Research shows diclofenac is the strongest and most effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine available.

What is stronger than meloxicam for arthritis? ›

Peak concentrations of Mobic are reached up to 5 hours after taking the medication. However, a second peak occurs about 12 to 14 hours after the first dose. This means that Celebrex works faster than Mobic, but the effects of Mobic may last longer than that of Celebrex.

Can I take Tylenol with meloxicam? ›

Interactions between your drugs

No interactions were found between meloxicam and Tylenol. However, this does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult your healthcare provider.

Which is safer meloxicam or ibuprofen? ›

In studies, the risk of acute kidney injury was found to be higher in patients treated with ibuprofen compared to those treated with meloxicam. This is important. Meloxicam may be safer on the kidneys, likely due to fewer effects on blood flow to the kidneys.

Can meloxicam be stopped abruptly? ›

Because meloxicam does not affect the systems normally associated with addiction potential, it is considered to be a nonaddictive drug from that standpoint. As a result, stopping use is unlikely to cause withdrawal symptoms that present with addictive substances, and use can be stopped abruptly without risk.

What are long term side effects of meloxicam? ›

Meloxicam Can Cause Long-Term Harm. All medications have potential side effects. Long-term use of NSAIDs may increase the risk of stomach or intestinal bleeding, ulcers, or holes. Long-term use of non-aspirin NSAIDs may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke.

What type of arthritis does meloxicam treat? ›

Meloxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to relieve the symptoms of arthritis (juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis), such as inflammation, swelling, stiffness, and joint pain.

Does meloxicam cause hair loss? ›

Meloxicam (Mobic), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), can cause hair loss, too.

Is meloxicam safer than ibuprofen? ›

In studies, the risk of acute kidney injury was found to be higher in patients treated with ibuprofen compared to those treated with meloxicam. This is important. Meloxicam may be safer on the kidneys, likely due to fewer effects on blood flow to the kidneys.

Can you take meloxicam for years? ›

Although 15 mg meloxicam is approved for the management of arthritis-related joint pain, it's not recommended for long-term use.

What is stronger than meloxicam for arthritis? ›

Peak concentrations of Mobic are reached up to 5 hours after taking the medication. However, a second peak occurs about 12 to 14 hours after the first dose. This means that Celebrex works faster than Mobic, but the effects of Mobic may last longer than that of Celebrex.

What does 15 mg of meloxicam do? ›

It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body. Meloxicam is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis in adults. Meloxicam is also used to treat juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children who are at least 2 years old.

When is the best time to take meloxicam? ›

Meloxicam is a once-daily non-steroid antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) that you can take by mouth at any time of the day. It's best take your medicine at about the same time each day, and with food or a meal to help prevent an upset stomach.

How many hours does meloxicam last? ›

Although both ibuprofen and meloxicam are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), meloxicam is a long-acting drug that can relieve pain for up to 24 hours and it is not prescribed in combination with other drugs.

What's the strongest anti-inflammatory? ›

What is the strongest anti-inflammatory medication? Research shows diclofenac is the strongest and most effective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine available.

What happens if you take meloxicam everyday? ›

Meloxicam may increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes, especially in people with heart problems. It can also have serious side effects on your gastrointestinal system (this risk may be higher if you use meloxicam long-term).

What are long term side effects of meloxicam? ›

Meloxicam Can Cause Long-Term Harm. All medications have potential side effects. Long-term use of NSAIDs may increase the risk of stomach or intestinal bleeding, ulcers, or holes. Long-term use of non-aspirin NSAIDs may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke.

Is meloxicam safe to use everyday? ›

For osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, the standard dosage of meloxicam is 7.5 mg once per day. The maximum daily dosage of meloxicam for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in adults is 15 mg per day.

Does meloxicam raise blood pressure? ›

This medication may increase or worsen your blood pressure. This can increase your risk of heart attack or stroke. Your doctor may check your blood pressure while you're taking meloxicam. Some medicines for high blood pressure may not work as well as they should when you're taking meloxicam.

What over-the-counter medicine is comparable to meloxicam? ›

Meloxicam is usually administered as a once-daily pill. Ibuprofen is a common over-the-counter (OTC) medication that is used for pain, inflammation, and fever in adults and children aged 6 months and older. Brand names for ibuprofen include Advil, Motrin, and Midol.

Is Tramadol better than meloxicam? ›

In conclusion, the study showed that the combination of tramadol 25mg and meloxicam 7.5mg had an analgesic effect similar to that of meloxicam 15 mg, but both were better than tramadol 50mg for relief of pain after the extraction of mandibular third molars.

Can I take meloxicam on an as needed basis? ›

Adults—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) once a day. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 10 mg per day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Can I take Tylenol while taking meloxicam? ›

No interactions were found between meloxicam and Tylenol. However, this does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult your healthcare provider.

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